Chasing the Dusk

The telephone survey of 500 Durham, N.C. residents included 160 whites, 151 blacks, and 167 Latinos, with a margin of sampling error of about plus or minus 8 percentage points for each group.

The above information was originally published By THE NEW YORK TIMES |  Paula McClain, The Journal of Politics

Dusk: The state or period of partial darkness between day and night; the dark part of twilight. As we take a look at our society, we find ourselves in some form or fashion grasping at what use to be. Like following the rainbow in search of that mystical pot of Gold; we find nothing but an illusion that in some twisted way, makes it seem comforting to keep on imagining. As a jilted lover continues to reminisce in the face of the obvious; the Dusk that we chase is that illusion of social construct and cultural branding. Though it appears to be right within our grasp; it manifest into yet another broken promise and dream of unfulfilled residue.

The light that confounds and at the same time placates us is the light of Privilege. Some of us fight to eradicate it and some of us fight to preserve it. But somehow this sweet-smelling temptation of Privilege is the false light that in various ways, hypnotizes all of western culture especially in this country into a narcissistic desire to worship at its altar by turning our whole life into nothing more than a temporary diversion away from the bright shiny object of privilege.

The days of old temped the children of Israel into a wanton desire to return to Egyptian oppression and bewitched them into a horrible display of Idolatry; building a Golden Calf. That same lust for the days of old drew that dominate culture’s mighty Egyptian army into annihilation by the submerging waters of the Red Sea.

Chasing the Dusk is futile because it is chasing what once was. In the Bible, “Lot’s wife” could not take her eyes off of the past and that was just where she stayed as a monument, forever reminding future generations to pivot away from the dusk. Privilege has birthed many offspring. Whether, we speak of the Race Card, Ethnocentrism, and Radicalism etc. All have drunk from the deceitful fountains of Privilege or its offspring.

In a New York Times article written in march of this year, a survey was taken concerning the varying degree at which the three largest ethnic groups viewed commonalities between one another. This is shown by the chart above from that same article.

In the chart, one thing that stands out is that there is nearly as much, and some in cases more, commonality that  African-American and Latino ethnic groups have toward the Anglos/Whites, as compared to one another. African Americans view themselves as having slightly more commonality with Latinos than with Anglo’s. Could this be because a long experience of oppression that this relatively newer and rising immigrant group is now experiencing in mass? The caveat to it all is that Latinos affinity for the Anglos  substantially exceeds Anglo’s affinity for them. Asians are not listed highly on any groups compatibility numbers. Needles to say, all things would as yet seem to orbit around the allure and effect of the people of privilege.

Finally we must all begin to pivot away from the dusk and look to this new kind of unity’ that of equality and not of arrogance.

“For I am about to do something new. See, I have already begun! Do you not see it? I will make a pathway through the wilderness. I will create rivers in the dry wasteland.” Isaiah 43:19 New Living Translation (NLT)

Kevin Robinson Executive Director of Accord1

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  1. […] to middle economic rungs are only operating under the illusion of protection and are in essence “Chasing the Dusk”. Some of these people have been indoctrinated by society to flaunt privilege about like a piece […]

  2. […] taken lightly. While many times the focus is on the provocation of racism, the ancillary effects of Privilege and the Race Card. A deceptive sentiment creeps into the fabric of ethnic/racial relations. A […]



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