Bridge Over Troubled Waters part 2 “the Promise”

If we are to Building the Bridge Together over the ethnic/cultural divide, how does one make this personal, real and more than just hyperbole? Many organizations and movements have various pledges, promises or decrees that articulate a tangible “buy in” of those interested in involvement. What would a promise/decree look like for those who want to build the bridge over the ethnic/cultural divide?   

First of all let’s look at what God says about the power of a promise.

You will decree a thing and it will be established for you and light will shine on your ways (Job 22:28 NASB).

When you promise to do something, you will succeed,

and light will shine on your path. Job 22:28 GOD’S WORD Translation (GW)

A pledge is either a promise solemnly and formally; “I pledge that I will honor my wife” or to pay (an amount of money) as a contribution to a charity or service, especially at regular intervals; “I pledged $10 a month to my favorite radio station”, it depends which one you mean.

This promise/decree, that one such Bridge building community, would be one that would exemplify the Godly impetus of appreciating, valuing and investing in human kind i.e. John 3:16

For God so loved the world, (appreciating, valuing) that he gave his only begotten Son, (investing) that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. (Promise/decree)

In this passage of scripture these two attitudes (appreciating, valuing) are clearly evident. These behaviors are followed by an action (investing) and finally they are established with a (Promise). This makes it all too clear that we should emulate God’s way of dealing with human kind.    

It would be a unifying vehicle, to use the essence of God’s truth through his word. It would be relevant and empathetic.

This promise would not compromise on God’s standards of morel and ethical character. It would not be accusatory or use non respectful language. This promise would become an invitation to move into deeper understanding of one another by acknowledging our differences. It would be one that would challenge it’s participants to stretch outside of their comfort zones

The words of those who would want to make a promise would not cause them to lose their identity but would seek to enhance it.

We should note Paul’s letter to the Corinthians in the Message translation

“Even though I am free of the demands and expectations of everyone, I have voluntarily become a servant to any and all in order to reach a wide range of people: religious, nonreligious, meticulous moralists, loose-living immoralists, the defeated, the demoralized—whoever.  I didn’t take on their way of life.  I kept my bearings in Christ—but I entered their world and tried to experience things from their point of view.  I’ve become just about every sort of servant there is in my attempts to lead those I meet into a God-saved life.  I did all this because of the Message.  I didn’t just want to talk about it; I wanted to be in on it!”  1 Corinthians 9:19-27 (The Message-MSG)

Notice how Paul parallels the above description of what a promise might look like.

This is what Paul’s promise/pledge/decree spelled out might look like, in the idea of Biblical multi ethnic diversity inclusion.

The Promise

I am free of the demands and expectations of everyone and will voluntarily become a servant to any and all in order to reach a wide range of people from any and all faiths and ethnicities. I will not take on any way of life that will jeopardize my relationship with Christ or His image to others.

Yet, I will enter anyone’s world and try to experience things from their point of view. Through the heart of a servant I will lead those I meet into a life of reconciliation with God and Humankind.  

I will do this because I agree and want to become a part of the conversation, but not only talk; I want to become full participant”.

“What would a promise/decree look like for those who want to build the bridge over the ethnic/cultural divide”?   

Kevin K. Robinson Executive Director of Accord1

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Comments
7 Responses to “Bridge Over Troubled Waters part 2 “the Promise””
  1. Karen says:

    This is good (very thought provoking)! There are so many “isms” in the “church”, not to mention the world. How does one bridge those gaps? Your explanation of the Apostle Paul’s way of relating to those outside the community of faith is appropriate, for the disciple of Christ, in any arena! – K Rogiers

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  1. […] involves respectful submission. This is exemplified in appreciating, valuing and investing in the other person. When we speak of investing, it entails stepping out and actually engaging. Someone must go first or […]

  2. […] true followers of Christ are called to the task of “Building the Bridge Together” over the ethnic /cultural […]

  3. […] reconciliation of us all depended on this single act of unselfishness and showed the importance of appreciating, valuing and investing in […]

  4. […] We can begin to move into the realm of trust when we take the focus off of ourselves. It is an invaluable position to be able to trust across the divides of ethnicity and culture. Common relationship is the key to empowering the connection that trust can provide. However, in a divided world “common” remains an enigma. From the biblical prospective, Christ shines brightly as a commonality of relationship between his followers and with those of whom they interact, through the John 3:16 values of; Appreciating, Valuing and investing. […]



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